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Monday, September 30, 2013

Station Life: Fire Hydrants


Fire hydrants are one of those things that just blend into the background of daily life. You probably drive past hundreds of them every day without seeing a single one. They are a simple fact of life in Brentwood; the grass is green, the sky is blue and there’s a red fire hydrant on nearly every corner. If you’ve ever really taken a look at the fire hydrants, however, you’ll notice that they aren’t completely red. In fact, some hydrants don’t have any red on them at all!

So why all the different colors? Why not just good old fashioned red and be done with it? Each color on a fire hydrant tells firefighters important information about that hydrant. The color on the bonnet, or top of the hydrant, lets firefighters know how much water that hydrant is capable of providing them. There’s nothing to look up, no manual to consult and no computer searching required. In the dark, during a snowstorm, in the pouring rain or on a sunny day firefighters will be able take immediate action based on the available water supply.  


A fire hydrant with a red bonnet signifies that it is known to flow up to 499 gallons per minute (gpm). All fire hydrants are red when they are first installed, and then Brentwood Fire and Rescue will test the flow of a new hydrant to determine how much water it is capable of producing. Once this number is known, the bonnet is painted the appropriate color. Brentwood is very fortunate to have a strong water system distributed through a carefully planned and well-designed infrastructure.

The color on the barrel, or body, of the hydrant lets the firefighters know whether the hydrant is part of the public water system or if it is a private hydrant. Private hydrants are ones where the water used is billed to the property owner the hydrant sits on, typically a church or business. These hydrants are yellow. If the hydrant barrel is red that means the water is city water, and the city is responsible for any costs associated with flowing that water. During an emergency firefighters will always utilize the nearest appropriate hydrant regardless of ownership, but after the emergency is mitigated there may be some sorting out of the billing required. After all, it wouldn’t be fair to expect a business to pay for the water used to fight a fire on someone else’s property. Ten gallons of water is one thing, but at a large fire there may be millions of gallons used to extinguish a well-entrenched blaze.


The orange bonnet on this hydrant means that it is capable of producing anywhere from 500 gpm to 999 gpm. The yellow barrel of the hydrant signifies that it is a private hydrant. Every year firefighters visit each hydrant to inspect it. This inspection process includes operating the hydrant to ensure that it functions properly and doesn’t leak. Additionally firefighters will paint the hydrant to keep it looking nice. Brentwood Fire and Rescue has recently contracted with a company to have several of the city’s oldest hydrants sandblasted. After years of painting there is a thick layer accumulated which prevents the hydrants from looking their best. After a visit from the sandblasting crew this hydrant will get a fresh coat of yellow and orange paint and look like new again!


This hydrant was recently sandblasted and treated to a fresh coat of paint. The green bonnet tells firefighters that they can expect between 1,000 and 1,499 gpm if they connect to this hydrant. The gauges attached to this hydrant are part of the hydrant testing process. Firefighters will test the water pressure under various conditions before utilizing a mathematical formula to determine the flow rate of the hydrant. 


A hydrant with a blue bonnet is a firefighter’s best friend when they need water. This hydrant is rated for the highest possible flow rate, which is in excess of 1,500 gpm. As was mentioned earlier, Brentwood has a strong water system, so flows greater than 2,000 gpm are not uncommon. In true firefighter fashion, these hydrants are often referred to as being ‘hot’. A hot hydrant is quite desirable on the fireground. Here you can see Brentwood Fire and Rescue Engine 3 connected to the hydrant by its front intake, ready to open the hydrant and receive water. Blue topped hydrants are the most common in Brentwood. In fact, they are so common that many neighborhoods don’t have any other colored hydrants at all.

The next time you find yourself stopped at a traffic light, take a quick look around. You’ll probably see a fire hydrant nearby. You’ll also be able to impress your neighbors by telling them how much water that hydrant down the street is capable of producing. If you see your local fire engine out checking hydrants, be sure to say hello!










Saturday, September 28, 2013

Fire Chief's Briefing for September 21 through September 26, 2013

Here is a summary of Brentwood Fire and Rescue’s emergency responses for the period of September 21 through September 26, 2013.


We responded to 43 emergency calls for service.


These calls can be broken down into the following categories:

Fire: 1

EMS/Rescue: 20

Hazardous Condition: 3

Service Call: 3

Good Intent: 2

False Call: 14


Here is an overview of significant events from this period’s activities:


Monday, September 23 at approximately 9:25 pm:

All BFR units were dispatched on a report of a residential structure fire.  Initial dispatch information indicated that there was smoke coming from the crawlspace of a residence.  C3, E2 and E1 arrived on scene to find a two story residential structure with light smoke visible near one side of the home.  C3 established command and E2 personnel investigated the area.  E2 discovered a small mulch fire near the structure.  E2 extinguished the fire and E1 crew members entered the crawlspace to check for possible fire extension.  Command cancelled all other responding units.  After further investigation it was found that the fire was started by wiring for exterior lighting.  E1 cut power to the residence and assisted E2 with the removal of smoldering mulch from the area or origin.  The lighting system was removed and E1 restored power to the residence.  Once all hazards were addressed command was terminated and all BFR units returned to service. 

 
Wednesday, September 25 at approximately 10:02 am:

E4 and R1 were dispatched on a report of a motor vehicle crash with possible injuries.  R1 and E4 arrived on scene to find a two car rear end type collision.  E4 crew members immediately began assessing the drivers for injuries.  Damage to one vehicle indicated that one driver may have a severe head injury.  Spinal immobilization of the driver was initiated by the E4 paramedic and the remaining E4 crew members assisted with securing the patient to a backboard.  R1 assessed the other driver for injuries and checked for any vehicle hazards.  EMS arrived on scene and patient care was transferred.  E4 assisted EMS with moving the patient to the ambulance and further care on scene.  EMS transported the patient to a local hospital.  Once all hazards were addressed E4 and R1 returned to service.


Thursday, September 26 at approximately 1:48 pm:

E4 was dispatched on a report of injuries from a fall.  E4 arrived on scene to find one patient on the sidewalk with obvious injuries.  E4 immediately established spinal immobilization and assessing the patient for further injuries.  The patient was secured to a backboard and the patient’s other injuries were dressed by E4 crew members.  EMS arrived on scene and patient care was transferred.  The patient was moved to the back of the ambulance and E4 assisted EMS with further patient care on scene.  The patient was transported emergency traffic to a local hospital and E4 returned to service. 

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Station Life: B Shift's Field Day


Recently Brentwood Fire and Rescue’s B Shift took advantage of the beautiful weather Middle Tennessee has been experiencing to conduct some training outdoors. Firefighting takes a mixture of strength and skill, and B Shift’s drill tested both of those abilities. The shift was broken down into teams based on their apparatus before rules and limited instructions were given. Crews would have to call on past experience and training to determine the best way to complete a given stage of the course. Once the start command was given, each stage was completed without stopping between them. 
At different points in the evolution crew members were asked questions that tested either their fire or medical knowledge. Failure to correctly answer a question would result in repeating that physical evolution. This forces firefighters to stay focused and think calmly while exerting near maximum effort. At the halfway point each crew was tasked with completing a children’s jigsaw puzzle. While this would be a snap under normal circumstances, the pressure of a stopwatch coupled with physical exertion and competition amongst your peers ratcheted up the pressure on the participants. All evolutions were completed in partial turnout gear while breathing from SCBA, as crew members were all on duty and subject to emergency response; some energy reserves needed to be retained.
 
To start things off, Crews were tasked with moving a tractor tire a set distance. Some teams used tools to assist them while others used brute strength. If you look closely, you can see four distinctly different methods of moving the tire; rolling it was not allowed.
 
 
Brentwood Firefighters respond to medical calls within the city, so carrying the gear and knowing what to do with it once you reach the patient seemed like a natural evolution to include.
 
 
Grab your ladder and prepare to raise…

Up and down, 10 times, from the ground to overhead and back down again.
 

Fire suppression foam comes in a variety of types and uses, and after lugging it across the field firefighters were quizzed on many of them.
 
 
Success! Now take it back to where you got it and move on to the next stage.
 
 
The pullup bar does not care if your arms are tired from carrying equipment…
 
 
Firefighting is, afterall, a team sport. Accomplish your given task by whatever means necessary.
 
 
Should something happen to one of your fellow firefighters, it is up to you to get them to safety, regardless of how tired you are.

There are many different ways to accomplish the task, it is just a matter of finding the one that works best based on what tools you have available.
 
Firefighting isn’t all fun and games, but it never hurts to make training fun. If you see firefighters out training, feel free to say hello and spectate. Enjoy the nice weather while we have it!

Fire Chief's Briefing for September 15 through September 20, 2013


Here is a summary of Brentwood Fire and Rescue’s emergency responses for the period of September 15 through September 20, 2013.

We responded to 40 emergency calls for service.

These calls can be broken down into the following categories:

Rupture/Explosion: 1

EMS/Rescue: 24

Hazardous Condition: 4

Service Call: 1

Good Intent: 3

False Call: 7


Here is an overview of significant events from this period’s activities:


Sunday, September 15 at approximately 12:05 pm:

E1 was dispatched on a report of a commercial fire alarm. Upon arrival E1 found a large commercial structure with nothing showing. E1 crew made access to an elevator room in the structure using keys from a Knox Box. The elevator room was emitting a strong smell of burned material and light smoke was visible in the room. E1 crew members determined that the smell and smoke were a result of the elevator’s hydraulic system overheating. Power to the hydraulic system was turned off and the elevator room was ventilated. E1 crew members checked elevator cars for any occupants and verified there were no hazards on other floors of the building. The property owner arrived on scene and was informed of the situation. Once all hazards were mitigated, E1 returned to service and quarters.


Thursday, September 19 at approximately 10:32 pm:

E2 was dispatched on a medical call for a report of an irregular heartbeat. E2 arrived on scene and began providing advanced patient care. Once vitals were obtained, a 12-lead ECG was taken by E2’s paramedic. The 12 lead revealed cardiac abnormalities that would require immediate intervention at a local hospital. EMS arrived on scene and patient care was transferred. E2 personnel assisted EMS with moving the patient to the ambulance and establishing IV access. EMS transported the patient emergency traffic to a local hospital and E2 returned to service.


Friday, September 20 at approximately 4:05 pm:

E2 was dispatched on a medical call for a report of an unconscious child. E2 arrived on scene and immediately began assessing the patient and providing advanced life support. A family member indicated that patient had become unresponsive for a short period of time but then regained consciousness before E2’s arrival. E2 personnel obtained vital signs and assessed the patient for a possible cause of the loss of consciousness. EMS arrived on scene and patient care was transferred. E2 personnel assisted EMS with loading the patient into the ambulance along with IV initiation and ECG interpretation. EMS transported the patient emergency traffic to a local hospital and E2 returned to service.   


Monday, September 16, 2013

Save the Date --- Public Safety Day 2013 is Coming!


*****PRESS RELEASE*****



CITY OF BRENTWOOD 

FIRE AND RESCUE

 

From:              Chief Brian Goss                               

Date:               September 14, 2013

Subject:          Press Release:  Public Safety Day Festival


 

 THIRD ANNUAL PUBLIC SAFETY DAY FESTIVAL ANNOUNCED

 
Brentwood – In an effort to better connect the public with the city’s fire and emergency services, the Brentwood Fire and Rescue Department will hold its third annual Public Safety Day festival on Saturday, October 12th 2013. The free, family-friendly event will take place from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. in the Kroger parking lot of the Brentwood Place shopping center, 330 Franklin Road. 
 

The festival will include children’s activities, static displays of fire and police vehicles, and free car seat checks.  There are also plans to have a residential fire sprinkler exhibition and a live vehicle extrication demonstration featuring tools and equipment from the city’s newest fire engine. 
 

Open house tours of each of Brentwood’s four fire stations will occur simultaneously with the Kroger parking lot events.
 

For more information about Public Safety Day, please contact the Brentwood Fire and Rescue Department at 615-370-0170.
 
 
 

 

 

 

Fire Chief's Briefing for September 9 through September 14, 2013



Here is a summary of Brentwood Fire and Rescue’s emergency responses for the period of September 9 through September 14, 2013.


We responded to 44 emergency calls for service.


These calls can be broken down into the following categories:

EMS/Rescue: 30

Hazardous Condition: 2

Service Call: 4

Good Intent: 3

False Call: 5


Here is an overview of significant events from this period’s activities:


Monday, September 10 at approximately 6:07 pm:

E2 was dispatched on a report of power lines down in the front yard of a residence.  E2 arrived on scene and found that some power lines had been damaged from a recent storm and were contacting the house.  Crew members used a TIC to evaluate the danger of the downed line.  After further examination it was determined that the lines were still energized.  E2 requested the power company to respond to the scene to secure the line.  While awaiting the power company’s arrival, the power line ignited a small utility box on the outside of the structure.  E2 crew members used a dry chemical extinguisher to extinguish the fire.  Once all hazards were addressed and the power company arrived on scene E2 returned to service.


Tuesday, September 10 at approximately 7:06 pm:

E1, E3 and C3 were dispatched on report of a smell of gas inside of a hotel.  E1 arrived on scene and established command.  E1 used a gas monitor to investigate the two rooms where the odor was first noticed.  All readings were within normal limits in both rooms.  E3 arrived on scene and used their gas monitor to check the rest of the structure.  The cause of the odor was determined to be a plumbing issue which was addressed by staff members.  Once it was determined there were no hazards present command was terminated and all units returned to service.


Friday, September 13 at approximately 11:23 am:

E3 was dispatched on a medical call for a person with an altered mental status.  E3 arrived on scene and immediately began assessing the patient for any possible causes of the altered mental status.  E3 crew members determined that the patient had low blood sugar.  An IV was established and the patient was given medication to increase their blood sugar level.  EMS arrived on scene and was given a full report of the patient’s condition.  After administration of the medication the patient began to become more alert and oriented.  EMS determined that they would remain on scene to monitor the patient and make a transport decision.  Once patient care was transferred, E3 returned to service and quarters.


Friday, September 13 at approximately 5:19 pm:

E2 was dispatched on a report of motor vehicle crash with injuries.  E2 arrived on scene to find a two car, rear-end type collision.  E2 crew members began assessing two patients and checking the vehicles for hazards.  Spinal immobilization was applied to both patients.  EMS arrived on scene and E2 crew members assisted with further patient spinal immobilization and preparation for transport.  Both patients were moved to the ambulance and transported to a local hospital.  Once EMS left the scene and all hazards were addressed E2 returned to service and quarters.

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

September is National Preparedness Month

Granny White Pike at Belle Rive and McGavock, May 2010.

Brentwood Fire and Rescue would like to remind you that September is National Preparedness Month. Take a little time this month to ensure that you and your family are prepared in the event of an emergency. In the event of a major catastrophe, such as the May 2010 flooding, a tornado or even a water main break, the number of requests for help may exceed the capacity of the department to respond. In the case of more calls than responders, priority is given to those in the greatest danger. 

Concord Pass at Concord Crossing, May 2010

While every effort will be made to respond to everyone in need, you may find yourself in a position of needing to fend for yourself until help arrives. One of the best things you can do to help first responders is to prepare yourself and your family before an emergency arises.

Harpeth River Drive, May 2010

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) suggests a four pronged approach:


Be Prepared: Know what to do before, during and after an emergency.

Make a Plan: Prepare, plan and stay informed for emergencies.

Build a Kit: Build a kit for disasters to be prepared.

Get Involved: Find opportunities to support community preparedness.


More information about each of these steps can be found at http://www.ready.gov/ .

A great way to get started is to begin preparing your disaster readiness kit. FEMA has created a handy checklist to help you identify the basics a good kit will include.




After gathering your supplies, be sure to visit www.ready.gov to start your preparedness plan. If you wait until disaster strikes, it may be too late. 

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Fire Chief's Briefing for September 3 through September 8, 2013

Here is a summary of Brentwood Fire and Rescue’s emergency responses for the period of September 3 through September 8, 2013.


We responded to 62 emergency calls for service.


These calls can be broken down into the following categories:

Fire: 5

EMS/Rescue: 36

Service Call: 4

Good Intent: 4

False Call: 12

Other: 1


Here is an overview of significant events from this period’s activities:


Tuesday, September 3 at approximately 12:24 am:

E4 was dispatched on a report of a vehicle fire in the driveway of a home. Upon arrival crew members found one vehicle heavily involved with fire and threatening to extend to the adjacent home. The fire was extinguished before it could spread, although there was minor damage to the structure due to radiant heat from the burning auto. Once the fire was extinguished and smoke was removed from the garage, E4 cleared the scene and returned to quarters.




Wednesday, September 4 at approximately 7:00 am:

E1 was dispatched on a report of an unresponsive person with CPR in progress. Upon arrival crew members found the PT lying in the driveway of a home with bystanders performing CPR. E1 immediately took over CPR, inserted airway adjuncts and attached their AED. Defibrillation was administered and CPR was continued. EMS arrived on scene and PT care was transferred. The PT was loaded into the waiting ambulance where advanced life support was continued to include intubation and intravenous administration of resuscitation medications. The PT was transported emergency traffic to an area hospital with two firefighters on board to provide further care.


Friday, September 6 at approximately 11:43 pm:

E3 and R1 were dispatched on a report of a single vehicle accident on I-65 Northbound. While enroute to the scene, responders were notified that two pedestrians had been struck by a second vehicle. Upon arrival crew members found three patients with minor injuries and two who had succumbed to their injuries. E3 established command and requested E2 on a second alarm to the scene for assistance. BPD shut down the interstate while fire personnel tended to the injured parties, who were transported non-emergency to an area hospital for further evaluation and treatment. Once the scene was under control it was turned over to THP to conduct an investigation. Fire units remained on scene to assist with manpower and lighting. Once this was complete all units were released from the scene.


Saturday, September 7 at approximately 1:42 pm:

Station 2 personnel were in the apparatus bay when they heard the screeching of tires and looked up in time to witness a 2 car head on collision in front of Fire Station 2. The firefighters responded to the scene to find two vehicles involved, one with heavy damage to the front end. The driver of the less damaged vehicle was standing by their car but the other driver was not able to exit on their own. Crew members quickly utilized the hydraulic tools on Rescue 1 to extricate the driver. Both drivers complained of minor injuries, but only the driver that had required extrication needed to be transported to the hospital once EMS arrived. After EMS cleared the scene, fire crews assisted with clearing debris and leaking fluids from the roadway before returning to quarters.


Saturday, September 7 at approximately 2:32 pm:

E1 and C3 were dispatched on a report of a snake in a residence. Upon arrival crew members found a small garden snake in the living room. The snake was captured without incident and released unharmed in a nearby wooded area before fire units returned to quarters.


Saturday, September 7 at approximately 2:50 pm:

E2 was dispatched to the area of Pine Terrace Drive for a report of smoke in the area. As crew members approached the railroad tracks they found an area approximately 200 yards long following the path of the tracks that was lightly smoldering and involved with spot fires. E2 utilized hand tools and pressurized water cans to begin extinguishment. Upon hearing E2’s radio report, E1 surmised that a train car malfunction may have caused sparks and that other areas may have spot fires. E1 found a small fire along the tracks in the area of Peach Court. E1 utilized their hand tools to extinguish the fire. Once all fires were extinguished E1 and E2 returned to quarters.

Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Fire Chief's Briefing for August 28 through September 2, 2013



Here is a summary of Brentwood Fire and Rescue’s emergency activities for the period of August 28 through September 2, 2013.


We responded to 42 emergency calls for service.


These calls can be broken down into the following categories:

Fire: 2

EMS/Rescue: 21

Hazardous Condition: 3

Service Call: 1

Good Intent: 6

False Call: 9


Here is an overview of significant events from this period’s activities:


Thursday, August 29 at approximately 4:37 pm:

E1 was dispatched on a report of a gas leak.  Initial dispatch information indicated that a gas smell and hissing sound were present outside of a residence.  E1 arrived on scene to find a service line to a residential gas meter disconnected and leaking gas.  A technician from the gas company arrived on scene right after E1 and secured the leaking gas line.  E1 personnel used their gas monitor to check inside the residence for any further leaks.  The doors and windows to the residence were also opened to assist with ventilation.  Once the gas levels inside the home returned to zero and all hazards were addressed E1 cleared the scene. 

 
Friday, August 30 at approximately 9:26 am:

E1 was dispatched on a medical call for a report of injuries from a fall.  E1 arrived on scene and found a patient with a significant fracture.  E1 immediately began providing patient care including IV access and further trauma assessment.  EMS arrived on scene and E1 personnel assisted with splinting of the injured extremity.  Once the patient was moved to ambulance and stabilized, EMS transported the patient to a local hospital.  E1 cleared the scene and returned to quarters.


Friday, August 30 at approximately 2:17 pm:

All BFR units were dispatched on a report of a residential structure fire.  Initial dispatch information indicated that a resident’s microwave had caught on fire and possibly spread to the kitchen.  E2, C3 and E11 arrived on scene to find a residential structure with nothing showing.  C3 established command.  E2 personnel made contact with the homeowner and a light haze was noticeable inside the home.  The homeowner indicated that they had extinguished the fire in the microwave with a fire extinguisher but was unsure if the fire had spread to other areas.  E2 crew members investigated the inside of the structure using a thermal imaging camera.  The defective microwave was removed from the structure and no further hazards were found.  Command cancelled all other responding units.  BFR personnel used an electric exhaust fan to remove the remaining smoke from the home.  Command advised the homeowner to get an electrician to examine electrical system of the house.  Once all hazards were addressed command was terminated and all BFR units returned to service.